Dea Podhajsky

Dea Podhajsky

Turkey Drive

Our annual Thanksgiving Turkey Drive for Apache Junction Food Bank has begun. It will continue through November 17. Turkeys may be left in the freezer in the Parish Hall kitchen. If you are interested in helping deliver turkeys to the food bank, please contact the office.

Announcements

 

All Saints Day is being celebrated during the 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. services today. You may join in the procession and carry the picture of a saint with you.

 

The first Sunday of each month is Family Sunday. Children are invited to serve as acolytes, chalice bearers, ushers, readers and gift bearers.

 

Please join us for coffee hour in the Parish Hall following both services.

 

Altar flowers are given by Cleta Robbins in memory of all loved ones.

Today at 9:15 a.m. is Adult Formation using the book Women of the Bible.

 

Today is the final day for our Fall UTO (United Thank Offering). Giving envelopes are in the pews; blue boxes are in the narthex.

 

Thanks to all who helped with the Harvest Festival on Saturday, October 26.

 

The Episcopal Journal is currently updating their mailing list. If you do not receive this publication and would like to or if there are changes in your information, please contact the church office with updates.

 

Forward Day by Day booklets for November through January are in the narthex.

 

Our church is helping support the Mexican organization Banco de Tapitas plastic bottle cap campaign to help children fight against cancer. Please add your plastic bottle caps to the bucket in the narthex labeled Caps-4-Chemo.

 

Please RSVP for our consecration service to bless our Stewardship pledges next Sunday, November 10 and to join us for a celebration meal afterwards.

 

Also on Sunday, November 10 we will honor our veterans. A list is in the narthex where you may add any names you wish to have included.

 

Today we begin our annual Thanksgiving Turkey Drive for Apache Junction Food Bank. It will continue through November 17. Turkeys may be left in the freezer in the Parish Hall kitchen. If you are interested in helping deliver turkeys to the food bank, please contact the office.

 

A list of November birthdays is in the narthex. If your birthday is not included, please add it. We will celebrate at the November 17 coffee hours.

 

The book ministry has a new home in what was the church office in the Parish Hall. Check out our wide selection of books and other Outreach opportunities. Also located

in that space are receptacles for Brinton School and A.J. Food Bank donations.

 

The Birthday Church is the small model church on the Altar Rail. It is our custom for people to place a donation in the church on their birthday which goes to Project Help.

 

In support of Brinton Elementary School, ECW is collecting socks (sizes 3-9) and underwear (sizes 5-7) for girls and boys as well as elastic waist shorts and long pants.

 

We are looking for people who are interested in visiting parishioners who cannot come to church. Please speak to Fr. Bob if you are willing to do this ministry.

 

The Diocese is sponsoring a Border Ministries Summit November 21, 22 and 23. Details are available from the church office or in the narthex.

Food Bank suggestions for next week: canned fruits, puddings, gelatin.

 

We are looking for someone who could give rides to the 10:00 service for two people who live near Main Street and Crismon. Also we need someone to give rides to two people who live near Recker and University. Please see Fr. Bob if you can help.

 

All men are invited to join a new group that will meet on the first and third Wednesdays at 11:00 a.m. in the Parish House. Contact Fr. Bob if interested.

 

We ask your prayers for those in our Prayer Circle, others whose names we do not

know and for the following who have requested prayers:

 

Amanda

Jerry S

Mary Ann

Ernest D

Len G

Tanny & Tom

Pat K

Terry

Mel & Russ

Rene

Chris R

Monica E

Bill S

Kim

Tim

Amy W

Robbie F

Nina & Sterling

Brenda

Ashley

Fred

Bill

Suzy

Paul & Peter G

Juan

Jane K

Bridgette

Karl

Patricia

Robin & Nate P

Carolyn

George

Tammy & Tom

Ruth

Casie J

Ken & Lydia

Patty

Robin

Chet & Margie

Ashley

Linda S

Andrew

Todd

Norma

Harry W

Brianna

Clint

Tiffany Ann

Janet

Peg

Christina

Ruby

Cleta R

Larry & Wanda

Allyah

Robin

Corina H

Jimmy D

Granville

James S

Annie

Cherie

Nathan

Mary C

Jenny H

Del R

 

Prayer Circle names will remain on the list for at least a month. Please call the office at 480-986-1145 or record on the sheet additions or deletions, noting those who should remain on. Thank you for understanding when names are removed.

 

If you know of anyone who is in need of a prayer shawl please contact Joan Crossman, Linda Jo Johnson, Jan Saik or the office.

Upcoming Events

 

Monday, November 4 is Farm Workers at 7:00 a.m.; breakfast at 8:00 a.m. in the Parish Hall and Project Ministry at 8:30 a.m.

 

Monday, November 4 at 5:30 p.m. is a dinner for Vestry and committee chair persons in the Parish Hall.

 

Tuesday, November 5 from 10:00-11:00 a.m. is a meeting of Al-Anon. Parishioners arewelcome to attend.

 

Wednesday November 6 at 8:00 a.m. is Walking on Wednesday at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist; at 10:00 a.m. is Bible Study; at 11:00 a. m. is Cursillo Gathering for women and men, all in the Parish House.

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, November 16 from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Transfiguration will host ameeting of the Diocesan Committee on Native American Ministries. All are welcome to attend.

 

Mark your calendars for these upcoming events: the annual ECW Rummage Sale November 22 and 23; the Advent Dinner on Saturday, December 7. Rummage sale contributions may be left in the Parish Hall storeroom.

 

We welcome new families and children at all of our services.

 

While in church, please be mindful of the sacredness of time and place.  Silence any personal communications devices.  We hope that you will warmly greet others while respecting those who wish to pray in the church.

 

Next Week’s Readings- November 10 —Twenty-Second Sunday after Pentecost

Haggai 1:15b-2:9 - Psalm 98- 2 Thessalonians 2:1-5, 13-17 - Luke 20:27-38

 

The Reverend Bob Saik, Rector  480-980-1981 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mr. Gary Quamme, Music Director This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mrs. Debbi Bloom, Treasurer

Mrs. Linda Ostmeyer, Office Manager 480-986-1145 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Office Hours: Mon-Thurs  8:00 a.m.-Noon   www.transfiguration-mesa.org

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The Book Ministry, Apache Junction Food Bank and Brenton Schools outreach programs are now located in the old church office in the Parish Hall. Check out our large selection of books for sale for only one dollar. Profits from books sales are used for camperships  to Camp Genesis. The collection bins for the AJ Food Bank and Brinton Schools are also located in the old office. 

 

Congregations that approach financial stewardship from a biblical perspective do not view the money Christians give to their church merely as a way to pay its bills. Rather, such congregations see financial contributions as a way to help people grow spiritually in their relationship with God by supporting their church’s mission and ministry with a percentage of their incomes.

Transfiguration has selected the theme “Shining Your Light” and the New Consecration Sunday Stewardship Program as a way to teach the biblical and spiritual principles of generous giving in our stewardship education emphasis this year.  Consecration Sunday is based on the biblical philosophy of the need of the giver to give for his or her own spiritual development, rather than on the need of the church to receive. Instead of treating people like members of a social club who should pay dues, we will treat people like followers of Jesus Christ who want to give unselfishly as an act of discipleship. NewConsecration Sunday encourages people toward proportionate and systematic giving in response to the question, “What percentage of my income is God calling me to give?”

 During morning worship on November 10th, Consecration Sunday, we are asking our attendees and members to make their financial commitments to our church’s missionary, benevolent, and educational ministries in this community and around the world.

Every attendee and member who completes an Estimate of Giving Card does so voluntarily by attending morning worship on Consecration Sunday. We urge people to attend who feel strongly opposed to completing a card. The procedure is done in such a way that no one feels personal embarrassment if he or she chooses not to fill out a card.

During morning worship our guest leader, Rev. Dominick Moore from St. Mathews in Chandler, will conduct a brief period of instruction and inspiration, climaxed by members making their commitments as a confidential act of worship. We pray everyone will shine your light and be inspired and committed to attend Consecration Sunday worship.

 Thanks in advance for your enthusiastic participation in Consecration Sunday events.

 

Transfiguration Stewardship Committee

Flat Charlie had a busy and eventful summer. He plans to be back for the Chile Harvest Festival. Stop by the bulletin board in the Parish Hall to see the places he's been. Thanks to all who participated through our Walking on Wednesday group. We will begin walking from the Parish House as a group begining on October 23rd. We would love to have you join us.

Cap-4-Chemo

Our church is helping support the Mexican organization Banco de Tapitas plastic bottle cap campaign to help children fight against cancer. Please add your plastic bottle caps to the bucket in the narthex labeled Caps-4-Chemo.

By Chris Whitehead

Club Ninos y Ninas
Hi Everyone,

You, the Church of the Transfiguration, and the others who donated towards our school supply drive for the Club Ninas y Ninos in Playas de Rosarito made the kids day today. We arrived as the kids were playing and being engaged in different activities and we started to bring in the supplies. The bags of paper and note books were of interest, but Annette and I had packed a huge suitcase with supplies and when we opened that to unload the supplies the kids were absolutely over the moon. We were told that they love art projects and the kids hugged the art supplies. Their happiness was almost overwhelming because for us in the US what we brought was not over the tip, but for these kids who have so little you gave them so much joy and they know that people who they have never even met love them. We have a story for whomever sent the three workbooks that will bring tears to your eyes. What could be better for our future than to let kids know that adults care for them. Thank you from the bottoms of our hearts and we weren’t allowed to leave without numerous hugs from the adults working with the kids.

 
  • Meditations on the ministry of St. Francis
    As an artist, an iconographer, and farmer, it has always bothered me that most artistic
    images of St. Francis of Assisi depict him as sweetly bucolic, praying before rose covered
    crosses and preaching to the birdies when, in fact, his whole life consisted of constantly
    violating the rules of his day. Why? Because he believed in the Gospels so intensely that
    he thought that Jesus’ mandate to love was a higher law than all the combined rules of
    society, culture, or of religion. And he also did his level best to follow the example of
    Jesus regardless of the personal cost. Francis was a radical and a rule breaker of the first
    magnitude.
    Rules probably originated to help insure the connectedness of a tribe or society. To
    connect one had to be accepted, and the measure of acceptance was to follow the rules.
    Therefore, Rule #1 is to “follow the rules.’ This rule is universal and ancient. In the
    Judeo-Christian tradition it dates back to Eden. Adam and Eve lost both acceptance and
    connection for a rule violation. Rule #2 would seem to be “don’t question the rules”.
    Questioning the rules in most societies, cultures, and religions seems to cause the same
    loss of connection and acceptance as breaking Rule #1.
    Rule #3 is “if rules conflict, the higher rule prevails.” This is probably a holdover from
    the days of kings, but this concept was important in Francis’ day and is still reflected in
    our own court system and our contemporary culture. How many levels of courts do we
    have in the United States? How many cases hinge on the interpretation of a rule? Even
    the outcome of sporting events can be decided by a rule!
    With this line of thinking so deeply ingrained in our psyches, it should come as no
    surprise that the way most of us try to connect with God follows the exact same model:
    Connection with God (salvation) is perceived as a personal responsibility requiring great
    knowledge (learning all the rules) and great discipline (following the rules). Yes, we are
    told of God’s grace and God’s love, but those are many times regarded as intellectual
    concepts with very little bearing on how we live out our lives. Like the Pharisees of
    Jesus’ time we tend to worship the rules.
    In 12
    th
    century Assisi and even more so today, even the Church itself seems to be hung up
    on the rules. If you look at the “hot” agenda items at almost any General Convention of
    the Episcopal Church over the past hundred or so years, you will see mostly arguments
    over the rules—particularly rules regarding acceptance and inclusion: Should we have
    human slavery? Do women have souls? Can we revise the BCP? Can women be
    priests? bishops? Can a divorced person re-marry? Can a gay priest be a bishop?
    Both Jesus and Francis dealt with the same kinds of issues, all of which can be boiled
    down to one question: Can people we don’t like or who don’t agree with us be thrown
    out of the garden?
    1 of 2
  •  
  • Francis’ answer to this question was to invoke rule #3—the higher rule—and here’s how
    it worked for him: “God’s rule is to love. Since God is greater than us, God’s love must
    be bigger than our love. Any of us can love those that the rules permit us to love, yet
    God loves them too. Therefore we need to expand the parameters of love to love the
    unlovable! In doing so we come closer to God”. And this is what he did. Francis loved
    the poor by voluntarily becoming poor himself, and in doing so put poverty in a whole
    new light. He called for peace in a time when even the church was calling for Crusades
    and war. And he brought a radical reading of the Gospel of Jesus Christ that depoliticizes
    our understanding of conversion even to this day. And like Jesus before him, Francis
    went out of his way to love those that society had ruled to be unlovable.
    This is what God said to Francis—and what God is saying to us every day:
    “I want to be in relationship with you.
    Can you expand the parameters of love beyond the rules that bind you?
    Can you teach this love to all my children by how you live your life?
    Can you connect with my whole family?
    How much can you love?
    Those are my rules”
     
    Bill
    2 of 2
 
  •  
  • Francis’ answer to this question was to invoke rule #3—the higher rule—and here’s how
    it worked for him: “God’s rule is to love. Since God is greater than us, God’s love must
    be bigger than our love. Any of us can love those that the rules permit us to love, yet
    God loves them too. Therefore we need to expand the parameters of love to love the
    unlovable! In doing so we come closer to God”. And this is what he did. Francis loved
    the poor by voluntarily becoming poor himself, and in doing so put poverty in a whole
    new light. He called for peace in a time when even the church was calling for Crusades
    and war. And he brought a radical reading of the Gospel of Jesus Christ that depoliticizes
    our understanding of conversion even to this day. And like Jesus before him, Francis
    went out of his way to love those that society had ruled to be unlovable.
    This is what God said to Francis—and what God is saying to us every day:
    “I want to be in relationship with you.
    Can you expand the parameters of love beyond the rules that bind you?
    Can you teach this love to all my children by how you live your life?
    Can you connect with my whole family?
    How much can you love?
    Those are my rules”
     
    Bill
    2 of 2
 

The books for our next season of book group. We will meet on October 11th and will read The Nickel Boys by Colsun Whitehead. November we meet on the 15th and read Pachinko by Min Jin Lee. December’s meeting is on the 20th and the selection for The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas. In January we will read The Murmur of Bees by Sofia Segovia. 

For our meeting on February 21st we will read At Play in the Field of the Lord by Peter Matthiessen. On March 20thwe will discuss Paris in the Present Tense by Mark Helprin. Our final meeting will be April 17th and the selection will be Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimandi Ngozi Adichie.

For more information contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

by Chris Whitehead

One of the most devastating things that can happen to any person is the diagnosis of a major medical disease. However, the disease is only the first devastation, the second devastation is the receipt of the medical bills that come after treatment. My personal experience with this is so evident of this issue. Upon passing out on an air flight to Miami I was admitted to Hialeah Hospital and Annette will tell you that I was more stressed out about how much this would cost than about what had happened on the plane, and I had medical insurance! When Annette was diagnosed with breast cancer we sat down and made a prioritized list of what we would sell to pay for her medical treatment. Sad to think that these are the first things we think about when our health is endangered.

 

As part of our capital campaign at Church of the Transfiguration we have committed to donate 10% of funds collected to RIP Medical Debt. This not for profit organization focuses on working with people who are in danger of bankruptcy or who fall below the poverty level and who have overwhelming medical debt. RIP Medical Debt negotiates with the hospitals and medical agencies to negotiate down the debt and then pay it off. The person with the debt will get a large yellow envelope in the mail that informs them that their medical debt has been forgiven and paid off. Imagine the feeling getting that envelope in the mail?

 

RIP Medical Debt will forgive $100 of medical debt for every $1.00 donated. An Episcopal church in Chicago retired $1.5 million of debt with a $15000 donation. This means that if we can raise the $70000 for the capital campaign a total of $7000 will be sent to RIP Medical Debt and $700000 of medical debt will be erased by our donation! Currently RIP Medical debt has a campaign in Arizona that would allow 85% of this money to be spent in Maricopa County. The other 15% will be used in the other Arizona countries. Please consider supporting this cause, that not only benefits our church, but also accomplishes our goal of sharing our wealth with others for as the Bible says we who give generously will receive back in greater measure.