Sunday September 29, 2019

In the early 1900s the Carnation Evaporated Milk Company was trying to find a way to get consumers to try their new milk product. The head of the company knew that high quality milk comes from healthy cows and they invested a lot of money in the health and well being of their bulls and cows. Because of his efforts, Carnation cows held the world milk production record for 32 consecutive years. They took this idea to another level with a slogan created in 1907, "Carnation Condensed Milk, the milk from contented cows”. The phrase became popular and it spawned a radio variety program entitled "The Contented Hour," which featured entertainers such as Dinah Shore, Jane Powell and Burns and Allen. Much later, the phrase became the inspiration for a book called “Contented Cows Still Give Better Milk - The Plain Truth about Employee Engagement and Your Bottom Line” which was published in 2012. The book promotes the idea that contented employees produce better results.   I don’t want to talk anymore about cows today but I would like to share how God helps humans to be content.

The first verse of today’s letter to Timothy encourages us to be content. “There is great gain in godliness combined with contentment”. How do we find contentment in our own life? What does Scripture suggest we do to be content? How might we pray that God will give us productive lives following in the footsteps of Jesus?

The letter to Timothy warns about the temptation that comes with money. It is clear that we should be satisfied with food and clothing and that nothing else is necessary for our human living. I have met some people who live like this and some are very happy and contented people.

We often misquote the phrase about money. How many times have we heard the expression that money is the root of all evil? That is not exactly what was written to Timothy. It says that money is a source of all kinds of evil. But there are many other sins that do not come from money. Still, money often leads us into temptation, for the love of money can trap us with many senseless and harmful desires. We don’t need money to be content, that is the point of the letter.

One of the risks of having money is described in the story of the rich man and Lazarus. We have no reason to believe the rich man came by his money in nefarious ways. He wasn’t a sinner because he had money. Rather the story suggests that the rich man was selfish, selfish to the point that he ignored the needs of the poor beggar Lazarus. Helping the poor is not something that is just nice to do. Jesus told us that we must help the poor in order to get to heaven. It is as simple as that. We are guilty if we do not help the poor. I found an interesting quote about guilt this week. It comes from Matthew Fox, an Episcopal priest whose teaching we may study more in the future. Fox wrote that “the opposite of guilt is not innocence - no one is innocent; the opposite of guilt is responsibility. We choose to wallow in our own guilt rather than to take responsibility for social justice and healing”. Fox seems to have taken this perspective almost directly from the story of the rich man and Lazarus. The rich man was guilty because he did not take responsibility for the needs of poor Lazarus.  

So, I think Jesus would say that we are more content, happier when we help others. Philip Sydney, an English poet and scholar, suggested that “doing good is the only certainly happy action of a man’s life.” My own experience would agree with that opinion. Helping others usually makes me feel better about myself. The only exception to that is when I feel as if I have been taken advantage of.

And the letter to Timothy goes further. Paul gives us a whole list of the things we should do: “pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, endurance, gentleness”.   “Fight the good fight of the faith,” he wrote. It seems that we are content when we live in the arms of Jesus. There are many synonyms for contentment including two of my favorites, comfort and satisfaction. But another way to say all of this is to use another synonym which is peace. I believe that we find inner peace when we are close to God and when we follow God’s will. For that is the time when we know we are doing the right thing and we know that God is with us.

As you are aware, I have been thinking a lot about peace lately. It really began after the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, Ohio. I feel that those killings and other killings have put us on edge. We no longer feel safe and we therefore are not at peace. For some, the shooting in El Paso takes on a special feeling because the shooter said that he wanted to shoot as many Mexicans as possible.   This massacre takes on greater meaning as an indication of racial divides that still exist in the United States and a reason why some might feel as if they are not wanted. When we are fearful, it is hard to find inner peace. So, let’s pray for an end to violence. When we do not feel connected to others in the world it is hard to find peace. Let us pray that all may be one.

We may be searching for peace in our own lives. We may wish to be reunited with a loved one from whom we have been separated. We pray that God will give us health in our relationships. We pray that God will release us from some struggle so that we may have peace in our hearts.

We may be worried about the threat of violence in our world. At this time, we in the United States feel the threat of terrorism but we may also be worried about the threatening words between Iran and the United States. We pray for peace for ourselves and throughout the rest of the world.

We may be saddened and disappointed at the inability of our elected representatives to listen to each other. Let us pray that our elected officials will work together for the common good. For our part, let us seek to understand those people who don’t see the world our way. Let us realize that they may have some good reasons for the beliefs that they carry. Let us pray for understanding and acceptance in this place and beyond. May we find peace with each other.

I believe that true peace will be found in the arms of our loving God. The reading from Jeremiah gives us a great sense of that. Jeremiah had been put in prison. The king was not happy with the prophet who kept telling the people of Judah to repent. Jeremiah warned of the impending threat from invading armies. But in the midst of his imprisonment and the expectation that his country would be lost to others, Jeremiah found peace in the promise of God. The peace was found in God’s encouragement to purchase land. The message was that God would once more make the land fruitful and that God would bring a time of peace to the people. 

Words of peace and contentment are found in the Psalm today. God is our refuge and stronghold. God will protect us from those who want to do us harm. I see an image of God as a magnificent eagle protecting us with strong talons, keeping us from danger with those magnificent wings. We don’t have to be afraid of the night. We don’t have to worry that anything bad will happen to us because God is bound to us in love. If we just call out to God, God will protect us.

Last night at our Saturday service, we prayed for peace. I hope that you will pray for peace. I know that the specific thing that you will pray for may be different than what I pray for. Last night, each of us wrote our own prayer for peace on a piece of paper and we put the folded papers in the basket on the altar. I invite all of you to take a piece of paper and a pencil from an usher and write your own prayer for peace and put it in the offering plate today.   Your prayer will not be looked at. It is between you and God.

Paul wrote to us that our contentment and our peace are found in godliness. We turn to God in all of our struggles, whether it be fear or anger or frustration or guilt or just a wish that humans would come together again. May you find your peace in the presence of God and may you share God’s peace with those around you. Amen.

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  • Proverbs 15:23
    “A person finds joy in giving an apt reply— and how good is a timely word!”