Sermon for October 13, 2019

Humans often think of people that are of different cultures, races or faith traditions as their enemies. We sometimes refer to people we don’t know as the other. History tells us the other people have been treated in the worst possible way. We remember times when Jews where treated as the other. We remember the programs in Russia and the genocide of the Jewish people by the Nazis. The same could be said of the treatment of Muslims in Bosnia in the 1990s or of the mass killing Tutsi’s in Rwanda, also in the 1990s. As a white person of European ancestry, I can speak about the things that European conquerors did as part of their efforts to subdue and colonize territories throughout the world. European countries entered into the slave trade in Africa in the sixteenth century and continued that practice for 300 years treating people as the other. The European conquerors treated the people they found in the new world as the other. In the United States, we mistreated the native people of the land and destroyed the tribes, the people and their culture. Soon, we will begin offering prayers for the Native American community as part of an effort to better connect with them. We are supporting the people who lead Native American ministries in our diocese. We already have connections through our Chile Garden as we grow native seeds to help those communities to grow crops that come from their own heritage.

We may wish that people were only treated badly in the past but I think it still happens today. Most of the time, when we get to know the people better we realize that they are just as human as we are. They have similar hopes and dreams that we have.

This past week, I was surprised to hear of the backlash by some people over the fact the Ellen DeGeneres and George Bush were seen talking and laughing together at the Dallas Cowboys game on Sunday. Some people thought that a gay liberal entertainer and a conservative former president should not talk to each other. DeGeneres responded to the criticism this way:   “I have friends that are conservative and I have friends that are liberal. I try to understand each side of the story and sometimes I realize that we cannot talk in detail about a political situation. Still, we are friends.” Her comments cause me to ask whether it is possible to heal the hostility that exists between ourselves and others? Is it possible that little acts of kindness can make a difference? I think so.

In today’s gospel, Jesus refers to the other as someone who acts better than the people he is normally associated with. He was talking about the Samaritan. We all remember that the Samaritans had separated themselves from the Jewish people. The difference between the two cultures was only that Samaritans worshipped God on Mount Gerizim instead of in Jerusalem. We might think the differences are small today and yet it was a significant difference in the time of Jesus.  It is the second time in Luke this year that we heard about the goodness of the Samaritan. In July the gospel story was about the Samaritan who cared for the man who had been beaten on the way to Jericho. The good Samaritan was the enemy of the Jewish people who loved and cared for a Jewish person. Luke wants us to understand that the other is the same as we are. Jesus told us to love our neighbors as ourselves and that everyone is our neighbor.

In today’s gospel, we learn God loves everyone. Jesus healed all ten of the lepers. He didn’t exclude the Samaritan. Jesus, our Savior, healed the enemy. God loves our enemies. It is a reminder that God cares for everyone and wants us to get along with one another.   And the Samaritan was the only one of 10 lepers who returned to Jesus and thanked him for healing them.  The message is clear that we are to value everyone and that we can be friends with people who are much different than we are.   It seems that we should “see our worst enemy, no longer as enemy, but as an agent of God’s love”. 

There is a second message that comes out of today’s gospel.   It is a message of thanks and gratitude to God and to our neighbor. Prayers of thanksgiving are one of the important prayers that we offer. And yet, we sometimes overlook the thanksgivings that we have for God. We get stuck asking God for the things we want or need and we forget that we should be thanking God for what we already have. I think that sometimes my prayers of thanksgiving are perfunctory, I say the words but I do it by rote, not realizing that each time I should say those words of thanksgiving with meaning. Let’s take some time in this service to remember the many things that we should thank God for. I am thankful that God put me here in the United States, a place of freedom and abundance. We are fortunate to have food and clothing and a place to live. We are thankful that God blessed us with friends and family. We are thankful for the beauty of creation. I am most especially thankful for the diversity of Creation that I experienced in the Galapagos Islands this summer. I saw things I had never seen before on that trip. We are also thankful for our faith.

How do we make gratitude a way of life? Our gratitude toward God begins with awareness and attentiveness. We open our minds to the things that are happening around us and the difference that God has made for us. We think about the times that God has healed us from whatever our infirmity has been. We think about all the other things that God has done for us. We spend the time to sincerely thank God for all God has done. Our thanks goes with the praise that we offer to God, praise that Jesus is our redeemer, our advocate. Praise and thanks go together.

It is also a time to be thankful for the work of others in our life. I ask you to think about all of the people that you are thankful for. And I ask you to consider the ways that you might show them your appreciation. I am thankful that God has brought a special group of people to this place, people who give their own time, talent and treasurer to this church.   I am sure that you can come up with other things to be thankful for. It might be easier if you remember a time you were thanked for something you did. Yesterday, our daughter was going through a tack trunk which held some items that she had used 17 years ago. Everything in the trunk was in good condition and our daughter called us to thank us for purchasing items that were still useful after all of these years. It made Jan and I feel so good to hear those words of thanks. We appreciated her remembering that we were part of what made her life special.

Gratitude is not just something nice that we do. We don’t show thanks to others just because our parents taught us that we should. Gratitude is a biblical call. We do it because Jesus told us we should. The Roman statesman Cicero was not a Christian but he said that “a thankful heart is not only the great virtue, but the parent of all other virtues.” William Law was a seventeenth century Anglican priest who wrote that “the greatest saint is not the person who prays the most; it is the one who is the most thankful.” Thanksgiving must be part of what helps us to be virtuous and God loving in other parts of our lives.

We have spent the entire Pentecost season reading from Luke’s gospel. This year, I have found Luke to be consistent in themes and today is no different. We have been told over and over that we are to love our neighbors as ourselves. We have been told that we should care for those less fortunate than we. I am sure that Luke has also been adamant that we are to be thankful for all we have been given but I haven’t heard it as clearly as I did this week. Let us be aware this week of all the things that we have to be thankful for. Let us turn and give thanks and praise for all that God has done for us. Amen.

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.

  • Psalm 119:105
    “נ Nun Your word is a lamp for my feet, a light on my path.”